Blood donation drive in Mumbai garners support on World Blood Donor Day

June 2013 │ India

The Corporate Responsibility team in Deutsche Bank India regularly organises blood donation camps in Deutsche Bank offices to encourage employees to donate blood. Since the first drive in 2009, over 2,700 units of blood have been donated by volunteers. This June, on the tenth anniversary of World Blood Donor Day, a blood donation camp was organised in Mumbai, and coordinated by Think Foundation, a non-profit which works in the areas of blood and platelet donation, preventation and testing of thalassaemia minor, and care for children suffering from thalassaemia major, a serious genetic blood disorder.

There was a flurry of activity in the cafeterias in our Mumbai offices at Nirlon B1 and B7 where the blood donation camp was set up. Employees across all levels and ages, from managing directors to analysts, volunteered to donate blood for the drive. The employees were first tested for haemoglobin and blood pressure levels, after which one unit of blood (450 millilitres) was drawn from each donor – a simple 15-minute procedure that can help save as many as three lives!



According to the Think Foundation, 650 units of blood are required every day in the city of Mumbai alone. Less than 10% of the national requirement is currently being met by donors.



Think Foundation coordinates the collection of almost 20% of Mumbai’s requirement for blood units and provides blood transfusions for over 1,000 children suffering from thalassemia. From the age of three months, these children need blood transfusions on an average of every 15 days throughout their lives.



The drive in the Deutsche Bank office saw 300 units of blood collected. In fact, the response was so unexpected, that the camp ran out of blood bags and had to regretfully turn down a number of volunteer donors.



Vinay Shetty, Vice President of Think Foundation, was delighted with the result and thanked Deutsche Bank for its support: “This will go a long way in helping kids suffering from thalassaemia and patients with crucial surgeries that were postponed due to inadequate supply of blood.”


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Last Update: September 1, 2013
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