Frankfurt am Main, March 15, 2010

Deutsche Bank closes the acquisition of Sal. Oppenheim Group


Deutsche Bank (XETRA: DBKGn.DE / NYSE: DB) announced today that it has closed the acquisition of Sal. Oppenheim Group. The purchase price was paid in cash and amounted to EUR 1.0 billion, excluding BHF Asset Servicing which is being on-sold.

Sal. Oppenheim jr. & Cie. S.C.A. is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Deutsche Bank AG. All Sal. Oppenheim Group operations, including all of its asset management activities, the investment bank, BHF Bank Group, BHF Asset Servicing and Sal. Oppenheim Private Equity Partners were transferred to Deutsche Bank. At the end of the year 2009, Sal. Oppenheim Group had assets under management totalling  EUR 137 billion.
 
As of the closing of the transaction the management of the Cologne-based private bank will be strengthened. Wilhelm von Haller, Chairman of its Management Board, François Pauly and Dr. Wolfgang Leoni will be joined on the Management Board by Jürgen Dobritzsch and Jürgen Fiedler, effective immediately. As Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Dobritzsch’s responsibilities will include Finance and Controlling. Mr. Fiedler will take on the responsibility for Risk Management as the Chief Risk Officer. Both gentlemen worked in executive management positions at Deutsche Bank over several years. It is intended that Pierre de Weck, member of the Group Executive Committee and Head of Deutsche Bank’s Private Wealth Management, will assume the position of Chairman of the Supervisory Board.

In the coming weeks the strategic realignment of Sal. Oppenheim will continue. The bank’s  independent wealth management activities will be expanded under the well-established brand name of the traditional private bank, while preserving its unique private bank character. The integrated asset management concept for private and institutional clients is to be retained. Pierre de Weck stated: “Sal. Oppenheim is well-positioned to serve its private and institutional clients as an independently operating bank. And it should stay that way. At the same time, we intend to grow further with Sal. Oppenheim and leverage its great potential to build on our market-leading position in wealth management.”

In conjunction with the strategic realignment, further sustainable reduction of risk positions  and a strengthening of control functions within Sal. Oppenheim will be undertaken. Over the course of the year 2010, Sal. Oppenheim will discontinue its investment banking activities. As previously announced, the Equity Trading & Derivatives and Capital Markets Sales units will be taken over by Macquarie. BHF-Bank will  be managed as a stand-alone unit while Deutsche Bank will examine various strategic options with BHF-Bank. The agreed sale of BHF Asset Servicing to BNY Mellon is expected to close in the third quarter of 2010.


For further information, please call:

Deutsche Bank AG

Press and Media Relations 
Michael Lermer: Phone (+49 69 910 31325) 
Klaus Winker: Phone (+49 69 910 32249) 
db.presse@db.com 

Investor Relations
Phone: +49 69 910 35395
Phone: +1 212 250 7125
db.ir@db.com  


About Deutsche Bank

Deutsche Bank is a leading global investment bank with a strong and profitable private clients franchise. A leader in Germany and Europe, the bank is continuously growing in North America, Asia and key emerging markets. With 77,053 employees in 72 countries, Deutsche Bank offers unparalleled financial services throughout the world. The bank competes to be the leading global provider of financial solutions for demanding clients creating exceptional value for its shareholders and people.

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