Previous exhibitions

Herland

November 18, 2014 – March 17, 2015

Barbara Astman / Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons / Cao Fei / Keltie Ferris / K8 Hardy / Miyako Ishiushi / Siu Lan Ko / Sondra Meszaros/ Wangechi Mutu / Judy Pfaff / Soledad Salamé/ Fanny Sanin / Elisabeth Subrin / Carrie Mae Weems / Saya Woolfalk/ Miwa Yanagi


Deutsche Bank has been collecting cutting-edge, contemporary art for over 35 years. The bank’s earliest acquisitions for the Deutsche Bank Collection include works by many women who have had a seminal influence on subsequent generations, among them Louise Bourgeois, Marlene Dumas, Isa Genzken, Eva Hesse, Lee Krasner, Jac Leirner and Joan Mitchell.

Continuing the tradition of supporting the perspectives of women, Deutsche Bank Art will present an exhibition of 16 noted women artists at its internal, onsite gallery in New York in November. The exhibition is being staged on the 20th-year anniversary of the Women on Wall Street conference and its initiatives focused on success for women in the financial sector.

The title of the exhibition, Herland, loosely references the 1915 novel of the same name, a version of utopia written as a trilogy by the pioneering American feminist and sociologist, Charlotte Perkins Gilman. In Gilman’s story, a three-man expedition discovers an isolated society composed entirely of women. This civilization is based on parthenogenesis (a form of reproduction without fertilization) and has an ideal social order: free of war, discomfort, and domination, rich in education and cooperation, and where pragmatism and aesthetics are equally considered in all pursuits. 

Following the spirit of this amusing and allegorical narrative about gender, ideals and community, eight renowned women from the Deutsche Bank Collection will display a recent work. In addition, and as a condition, each is invited to recommend a work by another female artist they admire for inclusion in the show.

Rather than trying to portray Gilman’s tale or extolling her feminist perspectives, the show seeks to highlight the traditional precedents of women supporting other women. The artists’ works in Herland are radically divergent yet touch upon a variety of universal themes, encompassing both utopian and dystopian versions of cultural hybridity, memory and transformation, nature and landscape, and personal and collective identity. At the same time, the concept further highlights the definition of the Deutsche Bank Collection: to present the diverse perspectives of contemporary artists from around the globe whose work has universal resonance.

Barbara Astman (b. USA), “I As Artifact #20,” 2008-11. Digital c- print, unique, 35” x 35”. Courtesy of the artist and Corkin Gallery, Toronto
Barbara Astman (b. USA), “I As Artifact #20,” 2008-11. Digital c- print, unique, 35” x 35”. Courtesy of the artist and Corkin Gallery, Toronto
Sondra Meszaros (b. Canada), “Dust and Ashes, from Shun series,” 2010. Charcoal on Stonehenge paper, 45” x 56 ½”. Courtesy of the artist and Corkin Gallery
Sondra Meszaros (b. Canada), “Dust and Ashes, from Shun series,” 2010. Charcoal on Stonehenge paper, 45” x 56 ½”. Courtesy of the artist and Corkin Gallery
María Magdalena Campos-Pons (b. Cuba), “The House,” 2013. Polaroid Prints, 20” x 24”. Courtesy of the artist and Stefan Stoyanev Gallery, New York
María Magdalena Campos-Pons (b. Cuba), “The House,” 2013. Polaroid Prints, 20” x 24”. Courtesy of the artist and Stefan Stoyanev Gallery, New York
Carrie Mae Weems (b. USA), “Lewitt’s Wall,” 2006 - present. Digital c-print, 73 3/8” x 61 5/8” x 2 ½”. ©Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Carrie Mae Weems (b. USA), “Lewitt’s Wall,” 2006 - present. Digital c-print, 73 3/8” x 61 5/8” x 2 ½”. ©Carrie Mae Weems. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
Cao Fei (b. China), “Airport, from “La Town,” 2014. C-print, 36” x 51.75”. Courtesy of the artist and Lombard Freid Gallery, New York
Cao Fei (b. China), “Airport, from “La Town,” 2014. C-print, 36” x 51.75”. Courtesy of the artist and Lombard Freid Gallery, New York
Siu Lan Ko (b. China), “One Only Cube,” 2008. Rubik’s Cube, 2.2” x 2.2” x 2.2”, Edition of 300. Courtesy of the artist and 10 Chancery Lane Gallery, Hong Kong
Siu Lan Ko (b. China), “One Only Cube,” 2008. Rubik’s Cube, 2.2” x 2.2” x 2.2”, Edition of 300. Courtesy of the artist and 10 Chancery Lane Gallery, Hong Kong
K8 Hardy (b. USA), “Position Series #20,”  2009. Chromogenic print, 30” x 20”, Edition of 3. Deutsche Bank Collection
K8 Hardy (b. USA), “Position Series #20,” 2009. Chromogenic print, 30” x 20”, Edition of 3. Deutsche Bank Collection
Elisabeth Subrin (b. USA), “Shulie Looking Back,” 2010. Digital c-print from 16mm drum scan. Courtesy of the artist
Elisabeth Subrin (b. USA), “Shulie Looking Back,” 2010. Digital c-print from 16mm drum scan. Courtesy of the artist
Wangechi Mutu (b. Kenya), “The Original Nine Daughters,” 2012. Suite of nine etchings with aquatint, linocut and collage, 18 ¾” x 10” each, Edition of 30. Published by Pace Editions, Inc. © Wangechi Mutu. Courtesy the artist and Pace Prints, New York
Wangechi Mutu (b. Kenya), “The Original Nine Daughters,” 2012. Suite of nine etchings with aquatint, linocut and collage, 18 ¾” x 10” each, Edition of 30. Published by Pace Editions, Inc. © Wangechi Mutu. Courtesy the artist and Pace Prints, New York
Saya Woolfalk (b. Japan), “An Empathic Preparing to Paint Images from the Book Empathetic Plant Alchemy (Jessica)," 2011.Archival ink-jet print on watercolor paper, 40” x 30”. © Saya Woolfalk. Courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York
Saya Woolfalk (b. Japan), “An Empathic Preparing to Paint Images from the Book Empathetic Plant Alchemy (Jessica)," 2011.Archival ink-jet print on watercolor paper, 40” x 30”. © Saya Woolfalk. Courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York
Judy Pfaff (b. UK), “A Thing with Feathers,” 2012. Mixed media in deep aluminum frame, 8’ x 8’. Courtesy of the artist
Judy Pfaff (b. UK), “A Thing with Feathers,” 2012. Mixed media in deep aluminum frame, 8’ x 8’. Courtesy of the artist
Keltie Ferris (b. USA), “Trio,” 2014. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 72” x 60”. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Keltie Ferris (b. USA), “Trio,” 2014. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 72” x 60”. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Fanny Sanin (b. Colombia), “Study for Painting No. 1 (6), 2009,” 2009. Acrylic on paper, 19” x 19”. Deutsche Bank Collection
Fanny Sanin (b. Colombia), “Study for Painting No. 1 (6), 2009,” 2009. Acrylic on paper, 19” x 19”. Deutsche Bank Collection
Soledad Salamé (b. Chile), “Brooklyn Bridge,” 2013. Print on industrial felt with embroidery, 20” x 26”, Edition of 7. Courtesy of the artist and Goya Contemporary Gallery, Baltimore
Soledad Salamé (b. Chile), “Brooklyn Bridge,” 2013. Print on industrial felt with embroidery, 20” x 26”, Edition of 7. Courtesy of the artist and Goya Contemporary Gallery, Baltimore
Miwa Yanagi (b. Japan), “Yuka, from My Grandmothers series,” 2000. Digital c-print, 63” x 63”. Deutsche Bank Collection
Miwa Yanagi (b. Japan), “Yuka, from My Grandmothers series,” 2000. Digital c-print, 63” x 63”. Deutsche Bank Collection
Miyako Ishiuchi (b. Japan), “Untitled (from Apartment),” 1978. Vintage gelatin silver print, 19.5” x 24.5”. Courtesy Andrew Roth Gallery, New York
Miyako Ishiuchi (b. Japan), “Untitled (from Apartment),” 1978. Vintage gelatin silver print, 19.5” x 24.5”. Courtesy Andrew Roth Gallery, New York

 


 

LIMA 130 K

November 13 – March 26, 2014

Solange Adum / Mariella Agois / Ernesto Benavides / Ana De Orbegoso / Maricel Delgado / Antonio Escalante / Marina García Burgos + Ricardo Ramon / Nelly García / Sebastian Gonzales / Roberto Huarcaya / Luana Letts / Musuk Nolte / Lorry Salcedo / Hans Stoll / Ricardo Yui


The long-standing photographic tradition of Peru spans more than a century of visual production, closely linked with documenting the social and regional characteristics of the coast, the Andean region and the Amazon forest. For Lima, the capital city, the 1970s were a period stamped by changes so profound that the size and social structure of Lima was forever redefined. No wonder those years became witness to a drastic change in photographic representation, and Lima became the new center for the production and development of Peruvian photography.

Forty years later, the transformation of Lima continues. Overflowing growth together with imminent social changes challenges the enduring relationship between Lima and the Pacific Ocean. The many contradictions existing between city and sea are further exacerbated by conflicting interests. Colonization, recreation, migration, inequality, environmental degradation, violence, and public access are all current issues underlying the works of these contemporary photographers.

From the northern to its southern boundary, Lima covers 130 kilometers of urban coastline. Each of the 16 artists captures various ways in which the town relates to the sea, using approaches including documentary, digital collage, image motion, conceptual and even photojournalistic techniques. These make up an extensive visual summary, one which ultimately links Lima´s wide heterogeneous range of cultures with its diverse photographic tradition. On the 500th anniversary of the sighting of the Pacific Ocean by Vasco Nunez de Balboa, it is clear that today both city and photography are so overwhelming that they defy comprehension if looked upon from a single place.  Rather, the intersection of art, urbanism and nature faces a broad sea of multiple perspectives and opportunities.

Carlos Caamaño,
Guest Curator

Ana De Orbegoso, "The rise and fall of Icarus," 2012. Photography based, mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.
Ana De Orbegoso, "The rise and fall of Icarus," 2012. Photography based, mixed media. Courtesy of the Artist.

 


 

Topsy Turvy
Coney Island Artists and the Amusement Utopia

June 24 – October 25, 2013

Bambi the Mermaid / Aaron Beebee / Zoe Beloff /  Coney Island Hysterical Society/ Homer Croy / Richard Eagan / William F. Mangels / Philomena Marano / Steve Powers / Marie A. Roberts / Dick D. Zigun

 


A century ago, there was a revolution in Western ideas of work and leisure that opened up new opportunities for creative entrepreneurs to make their marks on the world. New technologies of display in museums, department stores and amusement parks created a topsy-turvy world in which the skills of artists and creative thinkers were in remarkably high demand, and individuals who could think creatively were suddenly hailed as leaders instead of misfits. These new industries relied on the vision of creative individuals to make money and offered exciting new opportunities for artists and visionaries to make their marks on society, elevating popular culture and paving the way for pop artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein generations later.

 

In the 115 years since George C. Tilyou opened Steeplechase Park in Coney Island, Brooklyn, artists, small business owners, and creative individuals have been the leaders in a narrow field of entertainment and amusement that privileged creativity and textual prowess in architecture and design, and offered visitors a place to lose themselves in environments created by nominal outsiders. This strange, special environment continues to look like a world reflected in a funhouse mirror - where a misfit can be mayor and normal, middle-of-the road people are hailed as genius superstars.

 

The artists in this exhibition have all, at some point in their careers, been inspired by the unexpected freedoms that the amusement industry (at its height as well as in its decline) provides for creative thinkers. They have each gravitated to this nurturing space for their own creative outlet, and made the creative arm of the amusement industry all the richer for it. Inspired by the fantastic stories of Coney Island as a home for outsiders and “freaks”, they all create work that is at times literary and performative – and that references the history of amusement. “Topsy Turvy” celebrates the utopian concepts that bind this evolving artistic community, wherever their work takes them, as it continues to be shaped by shared interests and contemporary practices.  

 

 

The Coney Island Hysterical Society (Formed 1981, USA), “25 Shoot,” 2008. Wood Construction, Paint, Dimensional Screen Print. Courtesy of the Artists.
The Coney Island Hysterical Society (Formed 1981, USA), “25 Shoot,” 2008. Wood Construction, Paint, Dimensional Screen Print. Courtesy of the Artists.
Marie A. Roberts (*1954, USA), Sword Swallower, 2001. Acrylic on Canvas. Collection of Aaron Beebe and Deborah Matzner.
Marie A. Roberts (*1954, USA), Sword Swallower, 2001. Acrylic on Canvas. Collection of Aaron Beebe and Deborah Matzner.
Homer Croy (*1883-1965, USA), “Coney Island,” 1929. Serialized in Munsey’s Magazine, August-October 1929. Collection of Aaron Beebe.
Homer Croy (*1883-1965, USA), “Coney Island,” 1929. Serialized in Munsey’s Magazine, August-October 1929. Collection of Aaron Beebe.
Philomena Marano (*1952, USA), “Miracles Only,”  2011. Constructed Collage: Cut Paper and Paint. Courtesy of the Artist.
Philomena Marano (*1952, USA), “Miracles Only,” 2011. Constructed Collage: Cut Paper and Paint. Courtesy of the Artist.
Dick D. Zigun (*1952, USA), “Spook-a-Rama,” 1984. Photograph by Justine Woolner. Courtesy of Coney Island USA.
Dick D. Zigun (*1952, USA), “Spook-a-Rama,” 1984. Photograph by Justine Woolner. Courtesy of Coney Island USA.
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Last Update: June 22, 2015
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