60 Wall Gallery

60 Wall Gallery presents three to four exhibitions annually for the benefit of staff and clients. Curated by Deutsche Bank Art, the gallery is located in Deutsche Bank's Americas headquarters. Exhibitions feature highlights from the collection and works on loan by emerging artists and established galleries. 60 Wall Gallery serves as a unique opportunity to further demonstrate that Art works to broaden perspectives and enhance daily life at Deutsche Bank.

Current Exhibition

This Is Not A Pipe

June 13 - October 17, 2016

Thomas Allen / Marcel Broodthaers / Fernando Bryce / Tom Burckhardt / Joanne Calle / Shepard Fairey / Chris Johansen / Martin Kippenberger / Gabriel Kuri / Mosheka Langa / Ignacio G. Lang / Pavel Pepperstein / Mark Dean Veca

In an age of digital Photoshop, reality TV, and political campaigns, the veracity of images is not always defendable and is often beside the point. The industries of media, social and otherwise, know too well that the pairing of image and text is a great tool fo rthe imagination - used for everything from recounting history to political advertising, children's cartoons to marketing products. Even before Rene Magritte's iconic 1929 painting The Treachery of Images (ceci n'est pas une pipe) questioned the nature of visual representation, artists have been continually compelled to create devices that cast doubt on appearances and to exploit the possibilities.

Using strategies of humor and word play, thirteen international artists from the Deutsche Bank Collection mine this territory in various ways. Using a range of mediums, each present unique relationships between image and text that highlights the slippages between nature and artifice, truth and fiction, reality and surrealism. Marcel Broodthaers, another influential Belgian artist who was also a poet, made an entire artistic career questioning the nature of "value" and "taste", here visualized as rows of gold bars corresponding the names of famous old masters like Giorgione and Watteau with commodities like meat and chocolate. A few generations later, Gabriel Kuri explores similar terrain differently using newspaper stories, ticket stubs and other ephemera that measure our lives in quantum, time-based ways.

Like Mosheka Langa and Shepard Fairey, some identify with or pay homage to the people and artistic influencers that came before them, while others like Joana Calle and Fernando Bryce intimate darker memories related to colonialism and suppression in their own Latin American history. Fake news, comics, graphic novels in popular culture are also explored and repurposed here as strategies for examining past, present and future collective identities. The use of language as an integral part of the overall art image creates almost a "third wall" of believability. The incongruities produced are both playful and serious, and create a dialogue between works by these diverse artists.

 

Moshekwa Langa, “Titus”, 2007. Mixed media on paper 41 x 29”
Moshekwa Langa, “Titus”, 2007. Mixed media on paper 41 x 29”
Gabriel Kuri, “C94”, 2005. Turn stubs on vintage 15 x 16”
Gabriel Kuri, “C94”, 2005. Turn stubs on vintage 15 x 16”
Shepard Fairey, “Soup Can I”, 2005. Silkscreen and pencil 20 x 16”
Shepard Fairey, “Soup Can I”, 2005. Silkscreen and pencil 20 x 16”
Thomas Allen, “Noted”, Chromogenic print 2004. 24x20”
Thomas Allen, “Noted”, Chromogenic print 2004. 24x20”
Pavel Pepperstein, “The hands are breaking the ice”, 2013.  Watercolor and ink on paper 19 x 25”
Pavel Pepperstein, “The hands are breaking the ice”, 2013. Watercolor and ink on paper 19 x 25”
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Last Update: December 6, 2016
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