Deutsche Bank – Responsibility

Tackling key social challenges

Through our corporate citizenship programs, we tackle key social challenges. We focus on removing barriers to education and personal development, driving change to improve the condition for people and communities and to help overcome structural inefficiencies. In addition, we make cultural experiences accessible to a wider audience and provide a platform for young talent in art and music . This is how we build social capital.

In 2013, more than 2 million people benefitted directly from our corporate citizenship programs.

Corporate Responsibility

worldwide

Deutsche Bank’s corporate responsibility is brought to life in its regional units and endowed foundations. Their initiatives ensure that social capital is built in all regions in which the bank operates.

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More than 1,900 Deutsche Bank employees are actively engaged in reforestation.

Deutsche Bank employees plant new forests

Out of their business attire and into their work clothes and rubber boots. More than 1,900 Deutsche Bank employees are actively engaged in reforestation. To date, they have planted 33,000 new trees, creating healthy deciduous forests that help provide more good drinking water – about 11 million liters annually.

Mary-Louise Gray from Deutsche Bank and IntoUniversity have helped Vivian Oko pursue a university education.

IntoUniversity paves the way to the university

Mary-Louise Gray from Deutsche Bank and IntoUniversity have helped Vivian Oko pursue a university education. The educational program IntoUniversity, which supports young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, has paved a way for Vivian, who came to England just five years ago, to attend college.

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100 start-ups for India

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